Investment Professionals

2020 Trends in Robotics, AI, and Healthcare Innovation

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Jan 27, 2020

This is an extract of the ROBO Global paper 2020 Trends in robotics and AI innovation. To access the ROBO Global white paper, please click the download now button above. Companies around the globe are revising and rethinking their strategies to cement their futures in a world that is dictated by robotics, automation, and AI (RAAI). Deep learning, 5G, and computer vision are among the trends to watch in 2020 and beyond. 1. Computer vision Computer vision is the technology that gives computers and machines the sense of sight and the ability to analyse and understand the content of digital images. It is increasingly used throughout the manufacturing process to enhance product quality, reduce waste, and improve productivity in a variety of endmarkets, including consumer electronics, automotive, pharmaceuticals, and many more. 3D vision, a type of computer vision which has long been prohibitively expensive and complex, is set to accelerate with the help of Isra Vision in manufacturing, Koh Young in semiconductor and electronics inspection, and FARO and Hexagon in metrology and surveying. Computer vision is also enabling collaborative robotics and advanced driver assistance. Ambarella, the video processing technology provider, is rapidly morphing into an AI computer vision company. The company has received design wins for its CV chip in the professional security camera market and is engaged in several use cases in the automotive market. 2. Deep learning A subfield of machine learning, deep learning uses algorithms that strive to mimic the deep neural networks of the human brain. Reinforcement learning (RL), an aspect of deep learning, refers to goal-oriented algorithms that are the key to enabling autonomous robots, improving personalization, and accelerating drug discovery. RL will be used to dramatically improve the personalization of news and other content—a shift that will transform the massive data sets available to the advertising industry into practical, usable information— and to revolutionize myriad processes that can be simulated, including fraud detection and credit loan processes in the banking industry. 3. 5G The fifth generation of mobile wireless communications—5G—boasts features that have the potential to supercharge everything from business processes to how we engage with the Internet. Once it is fully deployed, 5G is expected to deliver up to 100x faster connection times than 4G and is expected to enable download speeds of 500-1500 Mbps in a matter of seconds. Major carriers are expected to roll out some type of 5G services in late 2020 and into 2021. Consumers will soon be able to choose 5G-compatible mobile devices from leaders like Apple, Samsung and Xiaomi, powered by Qualcomm’s latest 5G Mobile Platform Snapdragon. This best-in-class RF System provides peak speeds that promise to surpass most wired connections and transform the mobile experience. The Internet of Things (IoT) currently includes about 30 billion devices. The power of 5G will be more crucial than ever as this figure accelerates thanks to investments in autonomous vehicles, smart cities, smart factories, big data, and AI. ETFS ROBO Global Robotics & Automation ETF (ROBO) helps investors capture these trends across robotics, automation and enabling technologies. Find out more about ROBO here. For more information on accessing these trends through ETFs for your clients, please speak to ETF Securities. Sales Trading Phone +61 2 8311 3488 Email: infoAU@etfsecurities.com.au Phone +61 2 8311 3483 Email: primarymarkets@etfsecurities.com.au

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ETF Trends 2020

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Jan 23, 2020

To access the white paper, please click the download now button above. The continued evolution of the ETF landscape has seen it move from broad-based index replication, to select sectors, based on certain themes or even smart beta (alternative weighting to capture yield or value). In 2020, ETF Securities expects a number of trends to influence the ETF landscape across economic drivers, investor dynamics and enhanced investment styles. Below is a summary of these, you can also read more detail in the ETF Trends 2020 Whitepaper. Economic themes for ETFs Investors have been faced with globally low interest rates across 2019 and this is anticipated to continue due to geopolitical risks, such as tensions between US and Iran, or typical market volatility associated with a US Presidential Election year. Further to that, Australian investors have faced ongoing economic challenges from the slowdown in the resources and residential property sectors, stagnant wages growth and employment figures and will see further repercussions from the devastating 2019/2020 fire season. These themes will mean the following for ETFs: The quest for yield may see interest in US fixed income ETFs (due to the higher yield compared to Australia and Europe) as well as ETFs which can offer dividends for alternative sources of income. Commodity ETFs, particularly gold and silver, tend to benefit from low interest rates due to a low opportunity cost – as an asset with both consumption and investment appeal, it has a low correlation to equity markets and other assets and therefore tends to perform in a range of markets. Internationally focused ETFs will appeal to those wanting exposures outside of Australia and the weak Australian dollar, such as to regions like Europe, sectors less available in Australia like technology or currencies like the US dollar which continues to be stronger than its counterparts. Investor dynamics and enhanced investment styles Increasingly, investors are expecting greater transparency in their investments and want investments to reflect their ethical and social values. Following from the GFC and the Royal Commission, there is also greater cost and fee consciousness. ETFs naturally are benefiting from this environment due to attractive characteristics like transparency, liquidity and typically lower fees. Further to this, improving technology has allowed for greater tailoring of strategies and even active management. The ETF landscape is growing as a reflection of this. More ETFs are appearing in the market to offer access to specific themes or growth areas like robotics or emerging markets, or to reflect views or concerns on ethical and social matters, such as the environment. Continued growth in bespoke and smart beta strategies offering alternative weighting to the index or the ability to exclude certain factors to minimise risks. Some of these strategies are being developed at the behest of larger institutions but may eventually reach retail audiences as technology continues to advance. Active ETFs are emerging, and with the lift of the ASIC ban in December 2019, are likely to continue to grow. Across 2020 and the coming years, ETFs are likely to increasingly evolve to fill the gaps in investor needs and demands. For more information on accessing these trends through ETFs for your clients, please speak to ETF Securities. Sales Trading Phone +61 2 8311 3488 Email: infoAU@etfsecurities.com.au Phone +61 2 8311 3483 Email: primarymarkets@etfsecurities.com.au

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India: Down But Not Out

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Dec 09, 2019

Published: 5th December 2019 Product in Focus: ETFS Reliance India Nifty 50 ETF Key points: India’s economy has underlying strengths and over the past 12 years has become an economic powerhouse, jumping from the 11th to the 5th largest economy in the world. After a 2 year slow down, India’s outlook remains positive. RNAM forecasts GDP growth to recover towards 7% over the next 12-15 months. NDIA allows investors access to the Indian share market, a notoriously difficult region to invest, by tracking the performance of 50 of India’s leading blue-chip companies. India has been increasingly moving into the spotlight of many investors in recent years. Over the past 12 years India has jumped from the 11th to the 5th largest economy in the world and is likely to take 3rd position within a decade. This makes it difficult to ignore India when building a global equity portfolio. Further, the recent launch of ETFS Reliance India Nifty 50 ETF (ASX: NDIA), Australia’s first Indian-focused ETF, has provided investors with ready access to a market that was previously difficult to invest in. The case for India Structurally, India’s economy has underlying strengths that have enabled robust growth and provide a strong macro story. Demographics: with a median age of 28 years, India’s population is highly skewed towards young working-age people who drive both income and consumption. By 2030 India’s median age is forecast to rise to just 31, compared to 40 in the U.S. and 42 in China. Further, a dramatic urbanisation of the population is in progress, which will create a massive need for infrastructure investment across housing, transport, communications and utilities. Low debt levels: To this point Indian economic growth has not been excessively reliant on debt. Household leverage in India remains one of the lowest in the world, which presents a huge opportunity for sustained economic expansion. Strong domestic consumption: Nearly 60% of India’s GDP is driven by domestic private consumption, as compared to 40% in China. This provides India with a degree of protection against external demand shocks. Furthermore, India’s per capita spending is way below China and more in line with levels seen in China in the mid-2000s. Progressive reforms: India has undergone many reforms in the last 5 years. Most have been aimed at increasing compliance and transparency and removing red tape across the financial system. Longer-term, a stable and reform-focused regime should support an environment conducive to business and investment. Future Outlook While Indian growth has slowed over the past two years, the outlook remains positive. Reliance Nippon Life Asset Management forecasts GDP growth to recover towards 7% over the next 12-15 months. Key factors driving near-term growth include; Corporate tax cuts: India has recently reduced its effective corporate tax rate to 25.1% from over 30%. In addition, firms who set up new manufacturing units will enjoy an effective tax rate of 17.1%. This is expected to attract significant investment from foreign companies looking to access India’s domestic market and those looking to diversify away from China as uncertainty continues with regards to the global trade and tariff situation. Infrastructure spending: Government initiated infrastructure projects are a key driver of the Indian economy. It was recently announced that India will spend about $US 1.4 trillion over the next five years on projects including, for example, doubling the number of highways, airports and the capacity of ports, building 50 new metro systems in cities, electrifying and standardising the rail network and improving both rural irrigation and household access to piped water. Monetary policy: The RBI has cut policy rates by 1.35% over the past year to 5.15% to provide stimulus to the economy and counter the weakness seen in global demand. Low inventory levels: Inventory levels across the economy are well positioned to provide a favourable base for a recovery across the manufacturing sectors. Access to India The ETFS Reliance India Nifty 50 ETF offers Australian investors the ability to access the Indian share market via the ASX for the first time. NDIA tracks the Nifty50 Index, which is the primary benchmark for the Indian equity market. It not only provides a measure of the performance of 50 of India’s leading blue-chip companies, it also provides a representative picture of the entire Indian market. The 50 constituents account for 67% of overall Indian market capitalisation and 53% of total trading volume, as well as providing a broadly similar sector exposure to the wider market. Trailing returns Using India in a portfolio Investors looking to take a meaningful exposure to the Indian growth story should consider taking an exposure beyond broad emerging markets/Asia. India currently accounts for just 2.6% of global equity market capitalisation, despite having over 17% of the world’s population and 9.5% of the world’s GDP. In comparison, China, which is the most comparable country from a population perspective, currently accounts for 8.2% of global equity markets. [1] A tactical overweight to India would provide investors with a fairer reflection of India’s potential. While historical data does not present the entire picture of the Indian growth opportunity as it stands today, it is worthwhile investigating the impact that a heightened India exposure would have had on historic portfolio returns. To do so, we focus on the Asia ex Japan segment of world equity markets and compare the performance of the MSCI Asia ex Japan Index, which includes roughly a 10% allocation to India, to a portfolio comprised of 90% MSCI Asia ex Japan and 10% Nifty50 Index. The blended portfolio contains approximately a 19% India allocation. Cumulative returns over the past 20 years are shown in Chart 1. Over the full 20-year time series, the portfolio including the Nifty50 outperformed by 0.51% per annum, exhibited 0.5% per annum lower volatility and saw a 1% lower drawdown. By extension, risk-adjusted returns were also improved. Table Y summaries the portfolio risk and return characteristics over 3, 5, 10 and 20 years to give a picture of the contribution India would have made over a range of time horizons. In each case the over-weighting of India was positive for the portfolio from both a return and a risk perspective. Fund in Focus Name ETFS Reliance India Nifty 50 ETF ASX Code NDIA Management Fee 0.85%* Benchmark Nifty50 Index Inception Date 19 June 2019 Distributions Annual [1] Source: Bloomberg as at 30 November 2019. *Plus expense recoveries up to a maximum of 0.15% p.a.

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ESTX: Brexit Deal, Trade Deal, What’s New?

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Dec 04, 2019

Published: 4 December 2019 Product in focus: ETFS EURO STOXX 50® ETF Key Points As the chance of a no-deal Brexit becomes less likely and the UK looks set to leave EU in the next three months, the uncertainty that’s been overshadowing the European market for the last three years may soon be over. With the U.S. and China signalling they’re making progress to end their trade disputes, this could also offer some reprieve for the Eurozone’s economy, which has been a key victim of the U.S.-China trade war. ETFS EURO STOXX 50® ETF (ETSX) provides an investment proxy for those who believe these uncertainties will soon be alleviated, as the underlying economy of the Eurozone is deeply tied to both geopolitical events. Brexit May Come Soon Since the referendum held in June 2016, Brexit has remained in murky waters. In the latest turn of events, the EU has agreed to grant the UK another extension for three-months, however, given the frustration expressed by many leading EU countries, we expect this to be the last extension. Solving the deadlock around the Irish boarder is presenting a significant challenge for the UK parliament and EU to agree on. As such the UK may end up leaving the EU without a withdrawal agreement. Nevertheless, once Brexit happens, with or without a deal, the Eurozone will have one of its biggest overhanging uncertainties removed. Brexit has not been a good showcase to inspire other Eurozone countries to follow suit. The result of the European Parliament election held in May showed that although the uprising right-wing parties have seized more seats than ever before, the parliament is still firmly controlled by the pro-EU forces, while the next EU Parliament election won’t happen until 2024. We therefore expect a smoother ride for the Eurozone going forward, with other countries attempting their own Brexit seeming unlikely. Trade Wars and Europe President Trump started a big trade war with China and a mini-trade war with India, whilst also threatening to place tariffs on auto parts from Europe and Japan, although he is yet to act on these threats. America’s trade wars have caused havoc to the global economy and have already begun to harm America’s own economy. Investors who expect to see the U.S. unwinding more of its tariffs may invest in the eurozone, as it’s a good proxy for improving international trades. So how much damage has the U.S. trade wars brought to the Eurozone? Despite the U.S. not directly imposing tariffs on goods from the EU, the Eurozone economy has been affected by decreased trade and capital flows. Exports made up 46% of the Eurozone bloc’s output in 2018, compared to 12% of the United States’ and 19% of China’s, according to the World Bank. Looking into Germany, the biggest economy within the EU, the manufacturing PMI of the country has dropped from the 63.3 in December 2017 to the most recent 41.9 in October 2019, indicating that the manufacturing sector has been weakening for a while and is now in the contraction zone. Trade Talks Begin to Yield Results The most recent development of the U.S.-China trade war was a positive one. Following the meeting between the U.S. trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He, both the U.S. and China had signalled the two countries are close to reaching a “phase one” trade deal. A resolution to the trade wars could see a boost to the economy of the Eurozone given their reliance on and recent decline in international trade. Fund in Focus: ETFS EURO STOXX 50® ETF (ESTX) ESTX is designed to provide a blue-chip representation of super sector leaders in the eurozone. ESTX can be used as a tool for a tactical play for investors who believe the day for Brexit and the U.S.-China trade war resolutions are just around the corner. Name ETFS EURO STOXX 50® ETF ASX Code ESTX Management Fee 0.35% Benchmark EURO STOXX 50® Index Inception Date 19/07/2016 Distribution Frequency Semi-Annual

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Five reasons to hold gold at the core of your portfolio

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Nov 20, 2019

Published: 20 November 2019 Product in focus: ETFS Physical Gold Key Points: Gold has long been considered a safe-haven asset used by investors to hedge against event risk but is often not appreciated for the way in which it can aid portfolio returns in different market conditions. Over the long-term gold has close to zero correlation with share markets. This is good for investors. Uncorrelated assets provide diversification and help improve returns or reduce risk within a portfolio. ETFS Physical Gold (ASX: GOLD) is a simple and cost-effective and efficient way to access gold by providing a return equivalent to the movements in the gold spot price. At ETF Securities, as manager of Australia’s largest and the world’s oldest exchange traded gold product (ASX: GOLD), we spend a lot of time looking at how gold can work for our clients to improve outcomes across their portfolios. Gold is well-known as a hedge against event risk and as a way of preserving capital against inflation, but people often don’t appreciate how well a long-term holding can aid portfolio returns in different market conditions. When we talk about using gold in a portfolio, we tend to focus on its role as a core strategic holding, not an asset to trade in- and out- of on a regular basis. This article outlines five key reasons you should consider gold as a core holding. 1. Gold is an effective hedge against unpredictable events Gold has been one of best performing assets globally over the past year and has attracted a lot of attention. In Australian dollar terms gold has never been more valuable, having risen 32% over the 12-month period to the end of September. Not only has gold performed very well, but it has done so against a backdrop of rising geopolitical risk, periodic bouts of equity market volatility, global growth concerns and an abrupt shift in monetary policy, both domestically and abroad. The recent past is just one example in gold’s long history of performing well when markets are in turmoil or when risks are heightened. Other prominent examples include[1]; the 1987 stock market crash; gold rose 6% while the S&P 500 fell 33% the global financial crisis; gold rose 26% while the S&P 500 fell 56% the European sovereign debt crisis; gold rose 9% while the S&P 500 fell 19% It is not surprising, therefore, that many people use gold as a safe-haven asset in much the same way they would use insurance to protect their physical assets. Of course, you don’t just take out home insurance when you feel a flood or fire may be imminent, which is why we advocate holding gold long-term to protect against events that are inherently unpredictable. 2. The price of gold is driven by many factors and is difficult to predict Gold does not conform to traditional financial asset principles and there is no widely accepted model to determine a fair price for gold. While many different models exist, it is fair to say that the price of gold is driven by a wide range of variables and is difficult to predict. Gold is both a consumption and an investment asset, which often makes it both pro- and counter-cyclical at the same time. Levels of economic growth are positively related to demand for gold for use in jewellery and technology products, while expectations of lower growth may drive investment or safe haven buying. Gold is used as a store of wealth and as protection against inflation, while it is also in demand when interest rates and inflation are low and economic prospect look poor. Further, central banks are key investors and have massive reserves and a wide range of different motivations for owning gold, which can heavily influence demand. With such an array of competing factors for which to account, forecasting changes in the price of gold and the timing of changes is extremely difficult. We therefore rarely recommend gold as a trade-in/trade-out investment, where market timing is key. Instead we focus on how gold can be used as a core strategic holding. Depending on their circumstances, we often see investors using gold with a 2%, 5% or 10% allocation across their portfolios. 3. Gold’s long-term returns are better than many other asset classes Since gold became a freely traded commodity in 1971 its price has increased by an average of 11.7% per year in Australian dollar terms. Chart 1 shows how gold has performed relative to other major asset classes from the perspective of an Australian investor. While some investors worry that gold produces no regular income, its overall returns have out-stripped many more widely used investments. Gold has significantly outperformed both fixed income investments and diversified commodities. Its long-term returns are comparable with share market returns. Chart 1. Source: Bloomberg data as at 30 September 2019. Returns shown are compounded annual growth rates. Australian Equity is represented by the S&P/ASX 200 Total Return Index. Global Equity is represented by the MSCI World Total Return Index. Australian Fixed Income is represented by the Bloomberg AusBond Composite 0+ Yr Index. Global Fixed Income is represented by the Bloomberg Barclays Global Aggregate Total Return Index. Commodities are represented by the Bloomberg Commodity Total Return Index. 4. Gold helps diversify your portfolio when you need it most Over the long-term gold has close to zero correlation with share markets. This is good for investors. Uncorrelated assets provide diversification and help improve returns or reduce risk within a portfolio. Table 1 shows correlations between gold and other major asset classes over 20 years and you can see that gold generally has low correlations with other assets. It tends to be negatively correlated with equities, while being mildly positively correlated with bonds and commodities. Table 1. Source: Bloomberg data as at 30 September 2019. Correlations are calculated monthly over 20 years in Australian dollars. Australian Equity is represented by the S&P/ASX 200 Total Return Index. Global Equity is represented by the MSCI World Total Return Index. Australian Fixed Income is represented by the Bloomberg AusBond Composite 0+ Yr Index. Global Fixed Income is represented by the Bloomberg Barclays Global Aggregate Total Return Index. Commodities are represented by the Bloomberg Commodity Total Return Index. Not only has gold’s correlation with share markets been low, it has the nice property that it has tended to become more negative when stock markets are falling. Chart 2 shows the correlation between gold and global equities separately considering periods where the equity returns are positive, and then negative. This contrasts with other uncorrelated or “alternative” assets that became highly correlated with stock markets during the GFC. Not only does gold benefit from safe-haven buying during times of market stress, unlike most other financial assets, it has no element of credit risk, which immunises it from extreme market dislocations. Chart 2. Source: Bloomberg data as at 30 September 2019. 5. Gold can improve risk-adjusted returns over the long-term To demonstrate the impact that a core gold position can have in a portfolio, we have simulated adding a gold holding to a collection of typical asset allocation models that include Australian and international equity and fixed income assets with four different allocations representing Conservative, Balanced, Growth and High Growth profiles. Charts 3 - 6 below show the outright return, volatility or risk (measured by standard deviation), maximum drawdown or biggest loss and the risk-adjusted return (measured by the Sharpe ratio) for each asset allocation portfolio and for each portfolio with the addition of 2%, 5% and 10% gold. Source: Morningstar Direct data from 31 March 2003 to 30 September 2019. Conservative, Balanced, Growth and High Growth portfolios are represented by the Vanguard LifeStrategy funds, which have been live since February 2003 or longer. Gold is represented by ETFS Physical Gold (ASX: GOLD), which has been live since March 2003. Figures quoted are in Australian dollars and are net of fees. What we observe is that the addition of gold to an otherwise diversified portfolio has aided performance in every case. Outright returns are higher and increase as the gold allocation is increased. From a risk perspective, however, the impact of gold is even more important. The addition of gold reduces risk through gold’s ability to provide diversification. Risk-adjusted returns are higher and importantly drawdowns, or worst-case scenarios, are significantly improved. [1] Bloomberg data as at 30 November 2018

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