Investment Professionals

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Regulations on asset managers and financial advisers have increased in number and scope over the past 10 years. Much of which has been for the better. New Design and Distribution Obligations (DDO) which came into effect on 5 October 2021 will change how many types of financial products, including ETFs, can be sold. Under the regulations, ETF Securities is both a product issuer (a company that builds funds) and a distributor (a company that sells funds). We understand our obligations under the new regulations. Which include the below. What is DDO? Put simply, it tries to make sure that fund managers are creating funds that are “fit for purpose” and built with investors’ interests in mind. It also tries to ensure that companies selling or recommending funds – including financial advisers, stockbrokers and wrap platforms – are accurately presenting them to investors. DDO covers many types of financial products—not just funds. It also covers credit cards, insurance, some superannuation, home loans—and more. It was brought into being thanks to both the 2014 Financial System Inquiry and the Hayne Royal Commission. Both found that some financial products had been badly built and sold. ...
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For some years, commentators have been comparing the thundering run in technology stocks to the dotcom bubble of the 1990s. For the past three years, technology has outperformed all other sectors, as promising new technologies have captured investors' imaginations. But comparisons of the present day to the dotcom era are arguably misguided. And claims that technology stocks are in a dotcom-style bubble are most likely wrong. Today’s tech rally vs dotcom The first difference between the two eras is the strength of the tech rally. Simply put: the dotcom rally in technology stocks was far more powerful than today’s. Had you invested $1 into the S&P 500 Information Technology Index, the major gauge of US tech stocks in June 1997, it would have turned into $3.20 by March 2000—a whopping 320% return in just two and half years. ...
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Value investing, which involves buying beaten up and unloved stocks, has underperformed for years now. With central banks keeping interest rates low and global technology giants on a tear, growth stocks have thoroughly outperformed. But are things about to change? Steepening yield curve may mean a higher discount rate The yield curve has steepened sharply in recent months, as investors take stock of the coronavirus vaccine rollout and weigh fears that Biden’s stimulus package could trigger inflation. ...