Investment Professionals

The Future of Technology As we kick off 2021, there are six emerging technology trends that are set to define the next decade. Cloud Computing ...
Biotechnology has hit the headlines during the COVID-19 pandemic as companies race for vaccines and treatments, but its growth prospects extend beyond this period. Australian investors may be well familiar with this industry, given the dominance of CSL, but may be missing exposure to the international market, in particular, the US, the global centre of biotechnology. Download the full article here What is biotechnology? Biotechnology is a sub-industry of the healthcare sector and specifically refers to technologies that use biological processes, capturing companies that focus on research, development, manufacturing and/or marketing of products based on biological and genetic information. The different types of biotechnology include biological drugs, vaccines, immunotherapy, gene therapy, orphan drugs and genetic engineering. ...
Battery technology investments could be the answer for clients with an interest in the environment and a desire to incorporate this within their portfolios. Renewable energy and electric cars are set to take over fossil fuels as a source of energy in coming decades, but to do so, battery technology and storage will be critical. Renewables and battery technology Renewable energy, namely solar and wind power, are intermittent power sources. To rely on these is to require reliable energy storage in the form of batteries. Likewise, electric cars are completely dependent on battery storage to operate. The South Australian Hornsdale Power Reserve is the largest example in the world of battery storage for renewable energy, making Australia one of the leaders (surprisingly, given our coal industry) in transformation. Wind and solar energy are forecast to supply around 48% of world electricity needs by 2050, with battery technology, gas peakers (turbines or engines that burn natural gas) and dynamic demand anticipated to drive market penetration of solar and wind by more than 80% according to BloombergNEF[1] . To accommodate this growth, utility scale battery energy storage capacity is expected to more than double by 2022, while the market for battery technology is anticipated to reach $90bn by 2025, growing more than 12%[2][3] . How to invest in battery technology? ...
Recorded on the 27th May 2020. This webinar focuses on the alternative asset that is gold. In this webinar, we discussed: Gold's strategic and tactical place in a portfolio Understanding gold's valuation factors: The short, medium and long-term price drivers ...
Product in focus: ETFS Enhanced USD Cash ETF (ASX Code: ZUSD) Trading the greenback Many investors view cash as part of the defensive, and somewhat static portion of their portfolios, but in uncertain markets it might also be used as a trading tool to act on shorter term views and expectations of currency exchange rates. The US dollar is one such option that investors could consider, using an ETF like the ETFS Enhanced USD Cash ETF (ASX code: ZUSD). ZUSD aims to track the performance of an interest-bearing US dollar cash deposit by investing in US dollar bank deposits with maturities ranging from overnight to three months and earning a variable rate of interest. ...
How to build your clients’ portfolios to meet their goals The unpredictable nature of markets means that advisers need to be pragmatic and measured in their approach to meeting their clients’ goals, ranging from building a house deposit and paying for education to generating a consistent retirement income while maintaining enough capital for aged care deposits. Whatever the goals, most advisers typically need to be able to preserve a certain level of capital for their clients, while also investing for long term growth or for stable income. An enhanced core-satellite approach to portfolio construction can offer a cost-efficient and measured way to target investment goals and manage market volatility. Download the complete paper or read the summary below: What is enhanced core-satellite investing? ...
Investing has become a game of chicken in the eyes of some investors. Has COVID-19 become a buying opportunity? Have we seen the bottom, or is the worst yet to come? It’s hard to make any solid predictions in this unfamiliar territory – investment markets have experienced a health crisis rather than being undone by poor fundamentals, such as in the global financial crisis. The essentials, defensive assets and growth trends should be considered by advisers exploring the opportunities to tilt the satellite portion of their clients’ portfolios. Incorporating the essentials There are a number of areas which may benefit from the current situation – or if not benefit, then at least be largely able to continue normal operations. Companies in the consumer staples sector is an easy starting point. People need basic supplies to live and supermarkets like Coles and Woolworths continue to operate and have seen increased demand in these times. There are even pockets to consider in the consumer discretionary sector as people use lockdown to carry out home based activities or upgrade the technology they use to work from home. Infrastructure, such as railways, energy suppliers and telecommunications, is a sector that continues to operate in periods of volatility. These types of companies normally have monopolistic fee structures and have very high barriers to entry with predictable revenue streams. This means they aren’t expected to rise as much in good times but are less likely to be materially impacted in the bad times. In the current situation, telecommunications has benefitted from an increased dependence from a population working from home. An ETF like ETFS Global Core Infrastructure ETF (ASX code: CORE) can offer exposure to global infrastructure companies in a client portfolio. ...
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