Individual Investors

How to use thematic investing in your portfolio

Nov 02, 2020

Thematic investing exposes your portfolio to some of the major socioeconomic, environmental and technological themes of our times in a tailored way. So what does this actually mean and how can you use thematic investing in your portfolio? Download the whitepaper, here. What is thematic investing? Thematic portfolios look at long-term macro trends, such as robotics and automation, and then use various screens and information sources to identify the companies or assets which support this trend through infrastructure or services. It can span several sectors or even asset classes, for example, a thematic investment in technology is likely to include companies within the technology sector as well as those in other sectors which access this trend, such as Amazon or Netflix. Investment themes should be: Universal rather than specific to just one company or region1. Sustainable over longer periods, in some cases 20 years or more. Based on known patterns and pressures2. Some examples of well documented themes include virtual connectivity, ecommerce, biotechnology, the growth of the middle-class in Asia and climate change. How to use thematic investing in your portfolio Thematic investments are versatile and can be used in a range of ways, such as: To complement the equities component in the core of a portfolio. As a tactical tilt in the satellite portion of a portfolio towards trends or for growth. As a diversification tool to broaden from typical assets in a portfolio core. Whichever way investors choose to incorporate thematic investing within their portfolios, they should still consider the suitability for themselves and their portfolio, along with the risks involved - including risks that may be specific to a particular theme. Investors can consider a variety of options to access themes in their portfolios, such as: Direct shares in companies associated with a theme. Actively managed funds. Exchange traded funds (ETFs). Investors should be aware of different fees, minimum investments, brokerage, tax implications and W-8 BEN forms for some investments. There are different risks and benefits to using any of these approaches. Thematic investments offer investors the chance to be an active participant in the major forces driving human progress. They can also be the opportunity for investors to incorporate their passions within their investments, or even to have the potential of holding the ‘next big thing’ in a more manageable format. The increasing availability of tailored thematic investments in the market means they are more accessible than ever for investors to consider their suitability and fit for their needs, goals and portfolios. For more information on using thematic investments, please speak to ETF Securities. Client Services Phone +61 2 8311 3488 Email: infoAU@etfsecurities.com.au 1 https://www.stockbasket.com/investmans-playbook/thematic-investment-ideas 2 https://publications.csiro.au/rpr/ws/v1/download?pid=csiro:EP126135&dsid=DS2

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Powering the future: investing in battery technology

Jun 10, 2020

Renewable energy is a growing sector that is set to overtake fossil fuel energy in the future. Investors interested in this area should consider battery technology and storage, an area that is essential for the growth of renewables. A growing market: why battery technology? The value chain for battery technology ranges from mining companies, mining for metals like lithium, to manufacturers of battery storage and storage technology providers. All are potential beneficiaries of the anticipated growth in this industry. Lithium ion batteries have transformed the battery industry and accounts for 85% of commissioned, utility scale battery storage worldwide[1]. By 2022, utility scale battery energy storage capacity is expected to more than double, while the market for battery technology is anticipated to reach $90bn by 2025, growing more than 12%[2][3]. This growth is due to growing demand and increasing affordability of renewable energy like wind and solar power, along with the transition towards electric cars. Renewable energy in particular is an intermittent source and thus, dependent on reliable storage systems to ensure ongoing power. The Telsa-built Hornsdale Power Reserve in South Australia is a large-scale example of battery storage in play. How to invest in battery technology? Investors can access battery technology exposure in a range of ways. Focusing on value chain component companies such as mining companies or battery manufacturers. Considering broader established companies with some exposure to battery technology. Managed options, either active or via ETFs like ETFS Battery Tech & Lithium ETF (ASX code: ACDC). For more information about ETFS Battery Tech & Lithium ETF (ASX code: ACDC) or investing in battery technology, please contact us on 02 8311 3488 or infoAU@etfsecurities.com.au

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Three megatrends and how to invest

Mar 09, 2020

To access the white paper, please click the download now button above. Investors considering growth in the portfolio may find megatrends offer an alternative and sustainable long-term approach. So, what are megatrends and how can you invest in them? Megatrends are universal socioeconomic, environmental or technological forces that change the way we do things . These trends tend to be sustained over longer periods, in some cases, 20 years or more and based on known patterns and pressures . Investing in megatrends has become increasingly accessible in recent times. A range of ETFs have appeared in the market to target specific trends and incorporate a wide range of companies in that area. Three examples of megatrends follow. 1. Virtual connectivity and digitisation The internet is becoming faster and cheaper to access, with close to 60% of the world’s population already users . There are a range of opportunities following from the movement online, such as ecommerce or online entertainment and gaming. Even data storage and security are becoming major concerns. Access to this megatrend can be broadly through sectors like technology that service and fuel this trend, regions with companies dominating this trend, such as the US or across Asia, or via niche subthemes like robotics and artificial intelligence. 2. The growth of the Asian middle-class Two-thirds of the world’s middle-class population are expected to reside across Asia by 2030 and this offers potential for a range of industries, such as luxury goods, tourism, education and healthcare. Many global players have turned their focus to targeting consumers in this region, while regionally based companies like Alibaba or Infosys Ltd are well positioned for future growth. Investors can consider sectors like healthcare which will benefit from the growth or take a more concentrated approach by investing across Asia or within specific countries, like India. 3. Limited resources Ongoing population growth and climate change are placing pressure on available resources including minerals, energy, water and food sources. This has forced an evolution in terms of new products, how we consume and how companies interact with us. Renewable energy and battery storage is one area tipped to grow off the back of this megatrend. Many larger corporations have also started to adjust their operations too, for example, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos pledged $10bn to fight climate change through the Bezos Earth Fund . Investors may consider sub-themes like battery technology or electric cars, or they could consider industries which may experience higher demand on the basis of restricted resources like agriculture. For more information on the solutions ETF Securities offers, please contact us on: Sales Trading Phone +61 2 8311 3488 Email: sales@etfsecurities.com.au Phone +61 2 8311 3483 Email: primarymarkets@etfsecurities.com.au

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