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India is tipped for extraordinary growth in coming years, reaching GDP of $US9 trillion by 2030[1] and overtaking the US as the second largest economy in the world by 2050[2]. Even today, the value of the National Stock Exchange of India (NSE) exceeds the Australian market. The 50 largest blue-chip Indian companies as ranked by the NSE Nifty50 Index are valued at $A1825bn[3], representing approximately 60% of the market capitalisation of India. While Australian investors may be unfamiliar with India’s largest companies, many of these are not only dominant globally but supporting future growth in India. Kanish Chugh, Head of Distribution for ETF Securities, spoke to Kinjal Desai, Overseas Fund Manager – Equities for Nippon Life India Asset Management about five of the largest listings in the NSE Nifty50 Index and how they are driving India’s rise. The ETFS Reliance India Nifty 50 ETF (ASX code: NDIA) tracks the NSE Nifty50 Index, offering Australian investors exposure to the India economy. Servicing India and the world Some of India’s top companies exceed the entire S&P/ASX 200 in market capitalisation and may have a greater role in driving global growth, in addition to the Indian economy, than Australian investors realise. We explore five of these companies below. 1) Reliance Industries (11.1% weight in ETFS Reliance India Nifty 50 ETF as at 21st Dec 2020) ...
As an unusual and challenging year draws to a close, many investors may wonder what’s in store for 2021. The prospect of vaccines, a return to travel, and a more ‘normal’ life has given hope to a better year in terms of personal lives and has interesting implications for investing. Kanish Chugh, Head of Distribution for ETF Securities, spoke to James Gerrish, Senior Investment Adviser for Shaw and Partners and author of the investment newsletter, Market Matters, about the trends leading into the new year. Growth was the theme for 2020 In a year dominated by pandemic and bushfires, growth stocks were the key focus for investors, with many traditional value investments hit hard by lockdowns. “Growth stocks are dominated by IT names. They've benefited from lockdowns, they've benefited from more movement online, etc, and they've also benefited a lot over the last couple of years with declining interest rates,” says Mr Gerrish. ...
The dominance of the U.S. over global markets has long meant that its Federal Elections also influence investment activity on an international scale. The 2016 results may have caused global surprise and changed the political sphere, but will the 2020 election cause similar upset? Kanish Chugh, Head of Distribution for ETF Securities, spoke to Timothy Rocks, CIO for Evans and Partners, and David Lane, Director and Senior Adviser for Pitcher Partners about the upcoming U.S. election and how it will impact Australian investors. Market activity and US election results Traditionally, the lead-up to and the period immediately following a U.S. election can cause some uncertainty in markets. This year has been a bit different. ...
The future of renewable energy and electric vehicles (EVs) is heavily intertwined with the growing battery technology industry. Batteries are an older technology but recent innovation, particularly spurred by EVs, is transforming the space. Investing in battery technology holds appeal to a wide range of investors, from those focused on green energy to those looking for different growth themes to incorporate in a portfolio. Kanish Chugh, Head of Distribution, spoke to Corentin Baschet, Head of Market Analysis for Clean Horizon, about the changing battery technology landscape. Clean Horizon is a consulting company dedicated to energy storage and is the data provider for Solactive, the index provider for ETFS Battery Tech and Lithium ETF (ASX code: ACDC). The basics of batteries As an older technology, battery technology is both familiar and unfamiliar. Traditional batteries used a lead-carbon system, while the form favoured for grid and EV use today is lithium-ion batteries which are typically safer, more efficient and cost-effective. ...
In uncertain times, investors often question the best approach for their portfolio. The debate between investing in growth or value often comes up during uncertainty, particularly when certain aspects of growth investing may directly benefit from market volatility. Kanish Chugh, Head of Distribution for ETF Securities, spoke to Tom Schubert, Managing Partner and Portfolio Manager and Alex Cathcart, Portfolio Manager, from Drummond Capital Partners, about growth and value investing in the current uncertain market environment. The market outlook Drummond Capital Partners have developed three potential scenarios for the future, each dependent on whether certain events occur. Mr Cathcart says, “It has a lot to do with the interaction between fiscal and monetary policy, and what that means for the path of debt, both household and government, and ultimately what it means for inflation.” ...
How Morningstar identify the top tech stocks The year 2020 is one that will stand out in the history books, most notably for the COVID Pandemic but also the seismic shift in the geopolitical landscape. On the local and global investment scene, technology stocks have been front and centre. In our universe, arguably the purest global tech play available to Aussie retail investors is the ETFS Morningstar Global Technology ETF, (ASX code: TECH). TECH is up 15.6% this year as at 31st of August 2020, and provides exposure to 50 global technology names, tracking the Morningstar Developed Markets Technology Moat Focus Index. Talking Tech ...
Why gold should always be a portfolio staple Gold prices have surged to record highs and investors have flocked to hold it as an asset in the uncertainty of the COVID-19 pandemic. But gold is more than a temporary hedge and its characteristics can make it a valuable long-term component of a diversified portfolio. Kanish Chugh, co-Head of Sales for ETF Securities, spoke to Chris Brycki, CEO and Founder of Stockspot, to discuss how gold has been used in Stockspot’s portfolios and why it should be considered a portfolio staple. Gold - more than just an alternative Gold has traditionally been viewed as an investment safe haven due to its defensive and growth qualities. It has historically performed differently to other asset classes and offered positive performance in a range of market conditions. The performance of gold over the year-to-date, covering the COVID-19 pandemic and associated periods of volatility is shown below. ...
Is robo-advice the future of financial planning? The future of financial planning may feel uncertain at the moment, off the back of a raft of significant reforms and large numbers of financial advisers leaving the industry. Some speculate the future is digital, in the form of robo-advice. With even large international corporations, such as Goldman Sachs or Vanguard, incorporating such offers, robo-advice could have an attractive future. Kanish Chugh, co-Head of Sales for ETF Securities, spoke to Pat Garrett, co-CEO and co-founder of Six Park Asset Management, an Australian online investment management services firm founded in 2014. Six Park Asset Management aims to offer investors low-cost access to investment management. What is robo-advice? In basic terms, robo-advice is automated online investment management. ...
Products like margin loans and contract for difference (CFDs) may have been the traditional face of leveraged and inverse investing, but the emergence of leveraged and inverse exchange traded products (ETPs) has changed the landscape. Kanish Chugh, co-Head of Sales for ETF Securities spoke to David Tuckwell, Editor for ETF Stream, Zac Zacharia, Founder and Managing Director for Centra Wealth Group and Adrian Rowley, Head of Equity Strategies for Watershed Funds Management about this growing space and how they are using these products. Leveraged and inverse ETPs While leveraged and inverse ETPs bear some similarity to exchange traded funds (ETFs) in that they are listed on a stock exchange and traded this way, they are managed and operate differently. “A leveraged ETF is a bit like a magnifying glass. So it starts off with your regular old index, like the ASX 200 or the S&P 500, then it essentially magnifies the return on that index. If it's an Australian-style ETF, then it will magnify the exposure within a certain band. If it's an American-style one, it'll do it slightly differently and give you exposure, but a magnified exposure, but only for the day. Just to give a little bit of information on the inverse ones, the way they work is like a mirror when the market goes up, they go down and vice-versa,” says Mr Tuckwell. ...
The COVID-19 pandemic may have proved volatile for investment markets, but it also appears to have opened the door for new and existing investors seeking opportunities. What makes recent months particularly interesting is that investor behaviour in the latest market volatility has been unlike past panic activity. Kanish Chugh, Co-Head of Sales at ETF Securities, explored recent investor behaviours and interests with Gemma Dale, Director SMSF and Investor Behaviour at Nabtrade. Increasing investor activity ASX reports show a substantial increase in retail trading over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic, with average retail trading increasing to $3.3bn at the end of April 2020 compared to $1.6bn pre-COVID and many dormant accounts recommencing trading activity[1]. Nabtrade, one of the largest trading platforms in Australia, experienced much of this increased interest and activity. ...
Uncertainty and periods of volatility are an expected part of life as well as financial markets and investors should be considering how to factor these into their investment strategies. While there’s no easy fix strategy that can be used for all investors, effective strategies tend to share a few aspects in common. Kanish Chugh, co-Head of Sales at ETF Securities, discussed investment strategies for uncertain times with Andrew Connors, Founder and Director of Quilla, one of Australia’s leading independent investment consultants serving financial advisers and institutional investors. The characteristics of a good investment strategy A good strategy will be tailored to the individual investor’s needs, goals and circumstances but there are a few aspects that should hold true regardless. “You can’t avoid diversification. It’s still the only free lunch you get with investing, and what I mean by that is you can invest in two securities that, in combination, mitigate some of the risks of each of those securities individually, without necessarily impacting the return,” says Mr Connors. ...
The search for cures and vaccines during the COVID-19 pandemic has brought the biotechnology industry into sharp focus. Beyond the COVID-19 pandemic though, what does the future hold for this industry and the broader healthcare sector? Kanish Chugh, co-Head of Sales at ETF Securities, discussed the future of biotechnology and healthcare with Scott Power, Senior Analyst covering Healthcare, Life Science and Technology for Morgans Financial Limited. Defining healthcare and biotechnology The healthcare sector represents all businesses providing medical goods and services to treat patients. ...
Blue chip is synonymous with quality and dividends in the mind of the Australian investor, but are the companies considered as the blue chips of today likely to remain as the blue chips of tomorrow? The ability to generate a consistent dividend stream has been a mainstay of those companies we deem blue chip but in the wake of COVID-19 related dividend cuts, does the Australian view of blue chip need to evolve? Kanish Chugh, co-Head of Sales at ETF Securities, discussed the future of blue-chip investing with Peter Green, Head of Listed Products for Lonsec Research and James Gerrish, Portfolio Manager for Shaw and Partners and author of investment newsletter, Market Matters. Defining a blue chip investment “Blue chips have been in the past large size, industry leaders, well run and in the Australian context, very much also looking at dividends and fully franked dividends. So, we’re talking companies like the big four banks, Telstra,” says Mr Green. ...
COVID-19 has been responsible for significant changes in the way we live and work, but it is also influencing the ways we invest. After significant volatility in March, Australian markets posted gains in April with the S&P/ASX 200 returning 8.7%, the largest monthly gain in its history. Investment activity increased too, with even largely dormant investors returning to the fold[1]. Kanish Chugh, co-Head of Sales at ETF Securities, spoke to Anastasia Anagnostakos, Business Development Manager in the Investment Products Division of the ASX, on her views about how COVID-19 is changing the investment space. Changing investment behaviour Activity in April has been a contrast to the fears and defensive activity seen in March, as investors responded to global lockdowns and market volatility. “Last month, we saw a flight to safety through precious metal ETFs or broad-based market ETFs, whereas this month, investors, rightly or wrongly, are reading into the signs of a recovery, with Australian equity and property ETFs being the main beneficiaries, both being up by almost 12% on the month,” says Ms Anagnostakos. ...
India is poised to be an economic superpower, benefiting from structural factors such as business reform, income growth, urbanisation, domestic consumption and demographics. Tipped to be the world’s third largest economy by 2035[1], India holds appeal from a business and investment perspective. The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the outlook in many global economies but the challenges may only be temporary for India. Kanish Chugh, co-Head of Sales at ETF Securities, spoke to Kinjal Desai, Fund Manager Overseas – Equity for Nippon India Mutual Fund, on her views about India and the COVID-19 challenge. Managing COVID-19 With a population of 1.3bn, some commentators may have expected COVID-19 to ravage India but its infection rate has so far remained low compared to its population size. The Indian government was swift to enact measures[2] including: ...
The debate between active and passive investing has always been contentious but has taken an interesting twist in recent times. Some investors have sought a ‘best of both worlds’ approach by using passive investments in an active way. So, what does it mean to invest in this way, and does it work? Kanish Chugh, co-Head of Sales at ETF Securities, spoke to Nazar Pochynok, Financial Adviser at Bell Partner Creations and Andrew Wielandt, Managing Partner for Dornbusch Wealth, on Active investing with passive funds. Taking an active approach Normally when investors think of passive or active, they think of very specific investment products. Passive investments are defined as those which follow rules or a methodology to automatically follow an index or benchmark with the aim to “match the market”, while active investments are discretionary, meaning they are made based on a fund manager’s research and philosophy. “The way we use active management is a little bit different. We use it from a risk management perspective of looking at how to change the dynamic asset allocation of our passive portfolios,” says Mr Pochynok. ...
The effects, impacts and dislocations of the COVID-19 pandemic have been felt very heavily in the investment markets, and the fluttering of the black swan’s wings has certainly disconcerted income-oriented investors. The Australian addiction to dividends As interest rates ground lower in the 2010s in the wake of the global financial crisis, typical income strategies based on bonds became harder to justify. Income-seeking investors were effectively forced up the risk curve, toward corporate bonds, high-yield bonds, cash-generating real asset investments, and the share market. In particular, the income aspect of share dividends – turbo-charged by Australia’s dividend imputation system – became a major attraction, with effective yields in the 6%–8% range readily available. For this, investors had to accept several facts: one, that the dividends cannot be considered certain until they are paid; two, that dividends are paid at the company’s discretion, and can be cut at any time – even abandoned; and three, that they bore the capital risk of the share market. Finding yield in new areas ...
The ETF Securities Partner Series joins with Australian and international investment professionals to discuss the big issues of the day and what these mean for investors. It may not be surprising that market volatility has soared since the COVID-19 pandemic hit, but could this also be, to misquote the famous line, the correction ‘we had to have’? We spoke to James Whelan, Investment Manager at VFS Group, Michael Ogg, Director at Providence Wealth and David Lane, Director – Wealth Management at Pitcher Partners on whether we should have expected the financial impact of COVID-19 and what comes next. An overdue correction At face value, COVID-19 has been responsible for immense uncertainty in markets (even aside from what it has meant for daily life), but there’s more to the story. ...
The ETF Securities Partner Series joins with Australian and international investment professionals to discuss the big issues of the day and what these mean for investors. Rebalancing portfolios to strategic or tactical asset allocation weightings is a standard part of portfolio construction but in light of recent market volatility, many investors may be considering whether or not now is the time to rebalance. Kanish Chugh, Co-Head of Sales at ETF Securities, spoke to Zach Riaz, Investment Manager and Director for Banyan Tree Investment Group, and Chris Brycki, CEO and founder of Stockspot on the topic, To rebalance, or not to rebalance?. What is rebalancing? Rebalancing relates to overall strategy and the identified asset allocations the investor or investment manager believes will assist in achieving their strategic goals. As investments gain or lose value, the portion of the portfolio they represent may start to vary, so periodically investors may rebalance back to their determined asset allocations by selling or buying assets. ...
The ETF Securities Partner Series joins with Australian and international investment professionals to discuss the big issues of the day and what these mean for investors. Robotics, automation and artificial intelligence (AI) have rapidly advanced in recent years as humans look for more efficient and better ways to manage a range of activities. As the COVID-19 pandemic has forced us to rely more on technology than we ever have before, in many ways this crisis has been a benefit for this sector. ETF Securities spoke to Jeremie Capron, Director of Research for ROBO Global, on how robotics and AI have been affected during the pandemic and the prospects of the ROBO Global Index going forward. The COVID-19 era of uncertainty The pandemic has affected all areas of investment markets, with uncertainty and lockdowns reflected in market volatility. Most sectors offered negative performance for the quarter ending March 2020, but it is interesting to note that the ROBO Global Index was able to outperform broader global equities. ...
The ETF Securities Partner Series joins with Australian and international investment professionals to discuss the big issues of the day and what these mean for investors. The Australian ETF market has grown rapidly in recent years, with current market capitalisation at $56.63bn across 212 products [1]. Like other investment products, it has also been affected by COVID-19 driven market volatility. ETF Securities spoke to Martin Dinh, Senior Product Manager at the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) to explore his insights on the Australian ETF market and what has happened in recent months. The increasing popularity of ETFs The first Australian ETF was launched in 2001 and while growth in assets and available products was initially slow, taking nearly 16 years to reach $30bn in assets under management, the Australian ETF market doubled in value between 2017 and 2020. ...
The ETF Securities Partner Series joins with Australian and international investment professionals to discuss the big issues of the day and what these mean for investors. The COVID-19 pandemic is a serious threat, not just in terms of the virus itself but the broader implications to mental health from prolonged isolation. Collectively, we are experiencing something unprecedented in living memory. Uncertainty and rapid change tend to drive anxiety and fear, and the current situation is no exception. Kanish Chugh, Co-Head of Sales at ETF Securities, hosts a special edition of the ETF Partner Series to discuss How to survive isolation with Ian Shakespeare, Chief Executive Officer at SMG Health. Mental health, COVID-19 and isolation While China has been dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic since the start of the year, for the rest of the world, the situation really escalated from the start of March. In a short period of time, there has been dramatic changes to the way we live and work, and our freedoms massively curtailed. ...
The ETF Securities Partner Series joins with Australian and international investment professionals to discuss the big issues of the day and what these mean for investors. Periods of market volatility often mean investors question the construction of their portfolios. Using a core-satellite investment approach has traditionally been valuable in periods like this, as it gives the ability to pivot satellite investments to manage market activity. The theory might be sound, but is it holding up to the COVID-19 test? ETF Securities spoke to Jonathan Ramsay, Director of InvestSense on the topic ‘Does core-satellite investing still stack up?’ What is core-satellite investing? Core-satellite investing is a two-pronged approach to portfolio construction, where the core is made up of broad passive exposures to major asset classes (mainly equities and fixed income) and the satellite investments are more opportunistic and designed to seek specific growth outcomes, sometimes at higher levels of risk. These might typically be actively managed funds, but could also be investments in individual companies, real estate or one of a growing number of more-targeted ETFs. Generally, the core might be 65-85% of the portfolio, depending on the investor’s goals, investment horizon and risk tolerance, while satellites tend to represent 15-35% [1]. ...
The ETF Securities Partner Series joins with Australian and international investment professionals to discuss the big issues of the day and what these mean for investors. COVID-19 has dominated headlines for months and is influencing rapid change in the way we live and work. Change at any time can be unsettling, but combined with a serious health threat, it can drive anxiety and concern not just on a social level, but also in financial terms. ETF Securities spoke to Jon Reilly CIMA, Chief Investment Officer for Implemented Portfolios and Adam Dawes, Senior Investment Adviser for Shaw and Partners on the topic ‘Where are we now? Where are we going?’. The state of the nation for financial markets “We’re in the middle of a deliberate demand shock. We’ve chosen for very good reasons to shut down our economies, and it’s going to be a hugely dislocated, disruptive event, we know that.” Says Mr Reilly. ...

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