Resources

Top five ETF trends in 2020

Jan 24, 2020

To access the ETF Trends 2020 whitepaper, click here. The ETF landscape has expanded rapidly from the straight index replication of the past to more tailored offers covering themes, specific industries or sectors and even using alternative weighting. Advances in technology has allowed ETFs to become more sophisticated to meet with investor needs and demands. The value of the Australian ETF market is currently $A60.24bn[1] and is anticipated to continue to grow both in size and available options. Here are five trends likely to continue in 2020. 1. The search for yield Continued globally low interest rates means investors are seeking alternative sources of yield. Some are still looking at fixed income, but focusing on international options like the US, which has higher interest rate compared to its counterparts. Others are considering using equity dividend streams to help provide an income. Investors concerned about volatility risks for an equity approach might look towards infrastructure ETFs. The infrastructure sector includes many essential services areas like utilities, telecoms, industrials and transport which tend to be less vulnerable to market cycles and movements. Investments in gold tend to be popular with investors in times of low yield and market volatility. Holding appeal for both consumption purposes and investment, the performance of gold tends to have low correlation with other asset classes and tends to offer stability in times of market volatility. 2. Investing to offset Australian exposures Australian investments have been influenced over several years now by factors like slowdown in resources and residential property, along with a weaker Australian dollar. This has meant investors have needed to focus more on investing internationally to diversify the local risks and access growth and income opportunities. For example, investors are looking at particular growth themes like the middle class in Asia or at sectors not widely available in the Australian market, like technology. Currency ETFs are also becoming more popular, particularly those exposed to the US dollar which continues to be stronger than many developed nation currencies. 3. Thematic investing ETFs are becoming a cost-efficient and transparent way for investors to express their specific market opinions, growth themes, moral and ethical views or to target niche areas of growth. Concerned about UK post-Brexit? You might choose a European ETF which excludes UK companies. Passionate about new technology? A robotics or tech focused ETF might be for you. There is a movement towards ethical investing, with environmental investing a particular focus at the moment. As a quickly developing space with investor demand, there is likely to be continued growth in ETFs supporting this space, such as in alternative energy like battery technology. 4. Bespoke and smart beta strategies There has been a rise in ETFs using sophisticated rules or algorithms (smart beta) to ‘beat’ the market while still remaining passive. This might mean the exclusion of certain factors or using a different way of weighting investments compared to the index. For example, excluding companies in a particular industry. Or rather than weighting the investment based on company size, it might be weighted based on how volatile the companies are to market movements. Some ETFs like this are designed bespoke to large-scale institutions looking for both cost-efficiencies as well as the ability to match strategic or philosophical needs but still available to retail investors on the stock exchange. 5. Active ETF investing Active ETFs are an emerging area and typically track the strategies of active investment managers. ASIC lifted its suspension of new active ETFs in December 2019 and released new admission guidelines. Given international activity in this space as well, there is likely to be further growth in the available active ETFs in the Australian market. These may appeal to self-directed investors looking for active and liquid solutions with greater ease of use compared to many other active managed funds. For more information on accessing these trends through ETFs for your clients, please speak to ETF Securities. Sales Trading Phone +61 2 8311 3488 Email: infoAU@etfsecurities.com.au Phone +61 2 8311 3483 Email: primarymarkets@etfsecurities.com.au __________________________ [1] https://www.asx.com.au/documents/products/ASX_Investment_Products_November_2019.pdf

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ETF Trends 2020

Jan 23, 2020

To access the white paper, please click the download now button above. The continued evolution of the ETF landscape has seen it move from broad-based index replication, to select sectors, based on certain themes or even smart beta (alternative weighting to capture yield or value). In 2020, ETF Securities expects a number of trends to influence the ETF landscape across economic drivers, investor dynamics and enhanced investment styles. Below is a summary of these, you can also read more detail in the ETF Trends 2020 Whitepaper. Economic themes for ETFs Investors have been faced with globally low interest rates across 2019 and this is anticipated to continue due to geopolitical risks, such as tensions between US and Iran, or typical market volatility associated with a US Presidential Election year. Further to that, Australian investors have faced ongoing economic challenges from the slowdown in the resources and residential property sectors, stagnant wages growth and employment figures and will see further repercussions from the devastating 2019/2020 fire season. These themes will mean the following for ETFs: The quest for yield may see interest in US fixed income ETFs (due to the higher yield compared to Australia and Europe) as well as ETFs which can offer dividends for alternative sources of income. Commodity ETFs, particularly gold and silver, tend to benefit from low interest rates due to a low opportunity cost – as an asset with both consumption and investment appeal, it has a low correlation to equity markets and other assets and therefore tends to perform in a range of markets. Internationally focused ETFs will appeal to those wanting exposures outside of Australia and the weak Australian dollar, such as to regions like Europe, sectors less available in Australia like technology or currencies like the US dollar which continues to be stronger than its counterparts. Investor dynamics and enhanced investment styles Increasingly, investors are expecting greater transparency in their investments and want investments to reflect their ethical and social values. Following from the GFC and the Royal Commission, there is also greater cost and fee consciousness. ETFs naturally are benefiting from this environment due to attractive characteristics like transparency, liquidity and typically lower fees. Further to this, improving technology has allowed for greater tailoring of strategies and even active management. The ETF landscape is growing as a reflection of this. More ETFs are appearing in the market to offer access to specific themes or growth areas like robotics or emerging markets, or to reflect views or concerns on ethical and social matters, such as the environment. Continued growth in bespoke and smart beta strategies offering alternative weighting to the index or the ability to exclude certain factors to minimise risks. Some of these strategies are being developed at the behest of larger institutions but may eventually reach retail audiences as technology continues to advance. Active ETFs are emerging, and with the lift of the ASIC ban in December 2019, are likely to continue to grow. Across 2020 and the coming years, ETFs are likely to increasingly evolve to fill the gaps in investor needs and demands. For more information on accessing these trends through ETFs for your clients, please speak to ETF Securities. Sales Trading Phone +61 2 8311 3488 Email: infoAU@etfsecurities.com.au Phone +61 2 8311 3483 Email: primarymarkets@etfsecurities.com.au

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Weekly ETF Monitor for week ending 17 January 2020

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Jan 20, 2020

This week's highlights Precious metals Palladium and Platinum surged last week. ETFS Physical Palladium (ETPMPD) continued its run up 17.3% and ETFS Physical Platinum (ETPMPT) was up 6.2%. The flow on effects were seen in the basket of Gold, Silver, Palladium and Platinum. ETFS Physical Precious Metal Basket (ETPMPM) was also up 6.2%. Global and domestic equities continued their strong rally as they broke through and maintained all time highs. Vanguard Global Infrastructure Index ETF (VBLD) was up 3.3% and Magellan Global Equities Fund (MGE) up 3.2%. Global banks, oil and Australian dollar hedge funds were amongst worst performers. BetaShares Strong Australian Dollar Hedge Fund (AUDS) was down 1.1%, BetaShares Crude Oil Index ETF - Ccy Hedged (OOO) down 0.7% and BetaShares Global Banks ETF (Hedged) (BNKS) down 0.3%. Inflows for the week were $414 Million and outflows totalled $19 million. Majority of the inflows were seen by iShares S&P/ASX 200 ETF (IOZ). Outflows were highest from BetaShares S&P/ASX 200 Financials Sector ETF (QFN).

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Weekly ETF Monitor for week ending 10 January 2020

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Jan 13, 2020

This week's highlights Asian equities dominated the top performing funds last week, with CNEW, ASIA, IKO and IAA all returning 3.5% or more. Australian shares also had a strong week with the S&P/ASX 200 reaching new all-time highs. DIV and ILC were the week’s best performing domestic equity funds. Global banks (BNKS), gold miners (GDX and MNRS) and a range of commodity funds were the biggest decliners for the week. Precious metals were mixed. Gold rallied to 6-year highs following Iran’s military action against U.S. assets, before pulling-back as tensions eased. ETFS Physical Gold (GOLD) finished the week 1.0% higher. ETFS Palladium (ETPMPD) soared 7.5% to new all-time highs, while platinum and silver declined. Crude oil spiked above US$65/bbl before dropping sharply. OOO declined 6.3% for the week. Total flows into domestically domiciled ETFs were $368m, while outflows totalled $72m. iShares Core MSCI World All Cap ETF (Hedged) (IHWL) saw the largest inflows for the week, followed by a range of equity, fixed income and commodity funds. Domestic equity funds IOZ and STW saw the bulk of the week’s outflows. VAS was the most traded fund last week, followed by SWT and IOZ. IHWL and GOLD saw above average volumes. ETFS Morningstar Global Technology ETF (TECH) returned 38.1% in 2019 and is already up 4.4% in 2020. TECH provides equally-weighted exposure to a diverse range of technology companies that have strong competitive advantages in their field and are attractively valued, as determined by Morningstar’s analyst ratings.

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Weekly ETF Monitor for week ending 13 December 2019

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Dec 17, 2019

This week's highlights Global and domestic property fell last week with six of the bottom ten performers all providing exposure to property. MVA, VAP and SLF all posted negative returns. Asia, emerging markets and some precious metals had a strong week on the back of positive trade talks. UBS IQ MSCI Asia APREX 50 Ethical ETF (UBP) was up 4.7% and ETFS Physical Palladium (ETPMPD) up 4.6% as the metal scaled to new highs, falling just short of US$2,000/oz. Flows for the week consisted of $303 Million of inflows and $8 Million of outflows. Majority of inflows were to IOZ, to the tune of $80 Million. Hybrid and international and domestic equity ETFs also saw a good proportion of inflows. IOZ, VAS, STW and AAA were the top traded ETFs for the week keeping up the trend for the year. ETFS Physical Palladium (ETPMPD) year-to-date has returned 59.1%. The precious metal has a wide range of industrial and commercial uses in areas such as dentistry, medical equipment, jewellery and electronics. But its biggest demand comes from the automotive industry where the metal is used in catalytic converters to control the emission of harmful exhaust gasses.

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Weekly ETF Monitor for week ending 6 December 2019

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Dec 10, 2019

This week's highlights Domestic equities declined last week with the S&P/ASX 200 posting its worst week since early October. Domestic ETFs VHY, SELF, IHD, MVW, RDV, QOZ and SYI were all amongst the week’s poorest performers. The top equity performers were China funds CNEW and CETF along with Japan fund IJP. Bearish equity funds (BBOZ and BEAR) and Australian dollar fund AUDS also posted strong gains. Precious metals pulled-back last week, with the exception of palladium. Crude oil rallied sharply. OOO returned 7.3% and was the week’s top performing fund. Currency hedged commodities (QCB and QAU) were also amongst the better performers. Total flows into domestically domiciled ETFs were $309m, while outflows totalled $112m. New entrant, VanEck Vectors Australian Subordinated Debt ETF (SUBD) saw the largest inflows for the week, followed by a diverse range of fixed income, equity and commodity funds. A200 and AAA saw the bulk of the week’s outflows. A200 was the most traded fund last week, followed by VAS and VGS. SUBD saw strong volume in-line with its flows. ETFS Physical Palladium (ETPMPD) has returned more than 50% year-to-date. Increasingly tight supply and growing demand, primarily from the auto industry, have seen palladium prices trending higher for most of the past four years. At US$1,880 per ounce, palladium is trading at all-time highs and is now at close to a 30% premium to the price of gold.

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