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Weekly ETF Monitor for week ending 29 June 2018

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Jun 29, 2018

Global equity markets declined last week on global growth expectations. The S&P 500 dropped 1.3%, led lower by technology stocks. The EURO STOXX 50 declined by 1.3% and the Nikkei 225 fell by 0.9%. China's Shanghai Composite continued its recent decline, having now dropped over 22% from its January peak. Domestically the S&P/ASX 200 dropped 0.5% as gains in materials and energy stocks mostly offset declines in the financial and health care sectors. Australian resources ETFs (QRE and OZR) were among the top performers for the week, while VanEck Vectors ChinaAMC A-Share ETF (CETF) and ETFS Morningstar Global Technology ETF (TECH) were amongst the biggest decliners. Bond yields declined and the U.S. dollar strengthened last week. The Australian dollar ended the week lower at US74.05c, having dropped as far as US73.24c mid-week. The Chinese renminbi declined by 1.8% against the U.S. dollar. Oil prices rallied strongly on expectation of reduced supply. WTI crude gained 8.1% to end the week at US$74.15/bbl. Precious metals declined across the board, with gold down 1.4% and silver down 2.1%. The Australian ETF market saw inflows of $100m into and outflows of $82m from domestically domiciled funds last week. The largest inflows were into BetaShares Australian Sustainability Leaders ETF (FAIR). The largest outflows were from SPDS S&P/ASX 200 Fund (STW) and SPDR MSCI Australia Select High Dividend Yield Fund (SYI).

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Weekly ETF Monitor for week ending 22 June 2018

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Jun 22, 2018

Global equity markets fell on trade concerns last week, with the S&P 500 down 0.9%, the EURO STOXX 50 dropping 1.8% and the Nikkei 225 down 1.5%. Chinese equities also took a hit, with the Shanghai Composite Index down 4.4%. Locally, the S&P/ASX 200 defied the trend, gaining 2.2% as the financial sector rebounded from its recent dip. Financial sector ETFs (MVB, OZF and QFN) were all amongst the top performing funds for the week, returning in excess of 5%. Chinese equity funds (CETF and IZZ) were amongst the week's poorest performers, declining by more than 4%. The Australian dollar ended the week slightly lower at US74.40c, having dropped to a mid-week low of US73.46c. The euro and yen also gained against the U.S. dollar. U.S. 10-year Treasury yields declined by 3 basis points. OPEC agreed to loosen output restrictions last week, though the added production fell short of expectations sending WTI Crude 5.4% higher to US$68.58/bbl. Precious metals declined across the board, with gold down 0.7%. ETFS Physical Silver (ETPMAG) and ETFS Physical Palladium (ETFMPD) were amongst the week's biggest decliners. The Australian ETF market saw inflows of $60m into and outflows of $14m from domestically domiciled funds last week. The largest inflows were into BetaShares Australian High Interest Cash ETF (AAA) and global sustainability ETFs (ETHI and ESGI). The largest outflows were from BetaShares Australian Dividend Harvester Fund (HVST).

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Weekly ETF Monitor for week ending 15 June 2018

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Jun 15, 2018

Global equity markets were mixed last week with North Korea talks dominating the news flow, though with limited market reaction. The U.S. announced tariffs on $50bn of Chinese imports late in the week, sending index futures lower after market close on Friday. The S&P/ASX 200 added 0.8%, with Utilities and Telcos being the top performing sectors. The S&P 500 ended marginally higher, while the EURO STOXX 50 added 1.7% as the euro weakened. ETFS Morningstar Global Technology ETF (TECH) and iShares Global Consumer Staples ETF (IXI) were the top sector plays for the week. The Federal Reserve raised its target rate by 25 basis points, in line with market expectation. The Australian dollar fell by 2.1% to US74.42c. The euro declined by 1.4% against the U.S. dollar as the ECB said it would end QE by year-end. Commodities mostly declined last week. WTI Crude was down by 1.0% to US$65.06/bbl as speculation mounted that this week's Opec meeting will see an agreement on increased supply. Precious metals declined across the board following the tariff announcement, with gold down 1.5%. ETFS Physical Silver (ETPMAG), which fixed its NAV before the announcement, was the top performing ETF for the week. The Australian ETF market saw inflows of $64m into and outflows of $25m from domestically domiciled funds last week. The largest inflows were into iShares S&P/ASX 200 ETF (IOZ) and domestic and global sustainability funds (FAIR and ETHI). The largest outflows were from USD and YMAX.

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Weekly ETF Monitor for week ending 8 June 2018

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Jun 12, 2018

Global equity markets returned to risk-on last week. The S&P/ASX 200 gained 0.9%, led higher by energy and mining sectors. Three resources ETFs (QRE, OZR and MVR) were amongst the top performers for the week. The S&P 500 gained 1.6% and the Nasdaq 100 hit a new high. In Asia the Nikkei 225 added 2.4% and FTSE China A50 Index gained 0.8% as China A-shares debuted in the MSCI Emerging Markets Index. In Europe, the EURO STOXX 50 declined by 0.2% as the fall-out from the Italian election continued to impact market confidence. The Australian dollar gained 0.4% against the US dollar last week to end the week just above US76c. The euro regained some lost ground adding 0.9% against the U.S. dollar. U.S. 10-year Treasury yields rose 4 basis points. WTI Crude declined slightly to US$65.74/bbl. Gold added 0.4%, while silver gained 2.3%. ETFS Physical Palladium (ETPMPD) returned 1.9% for the week. The Australian ETF market saw inflows of $126m into and outflows of $17m from domestically domiciled funds last week. The largest inflows were into SPDR S&P/ASX 200 Fund (STW) and other domestic equity funds (QOZ and MVW). The largest outflows were from domestic dividend and strategy ETFs; RDV, HVST and MVOL.

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ETF Volatility - Truths and Misconceptions

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May 31, 2018

ETFSTrade idea:  ETF Volatility - Truths and Misconceptions In this week’s ETFS Trade idea, we look at the misconceptions around ETFs causing volatility and explain why these are myths. High level observations: ETFs have been unfairly targeted as the cause of market volatility ETFs tracking the ASX 200 have successfully stayed in line with the volatility of the benchmark ETFs can cause movements in the underlying market but so do active funds and investors buying securities directly In nearly all cases ETFs match the volatility of the market they track and this is what should be expected from an index tracking fund

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