Resources

Three ways to manage a retirement portfolio

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Feb 11, 2020

To access the 'No retirement for investments' white paper, please click the download now button above. Important notice: a previous version of this whitepaper incorrectly stated the ASFA comfortable retirement standards for a couple as $43,787/year and superannuation balance of $545,000. These figures relate to the comfortable retirement standards of a single not a couple. The standards for a couple are $61,786/year and $640,000 in superannuation balance. The duelling forces of retirement It is normal for retired investors to need to manage their portfolios for a stable income, a level of growth and capital protection, but current market conditions are making this particularly challenging. Faced with globally low interest rates on one hand as a threat to their income, and market volatility from geopolitics like corona virus and tensions in Iran affecting growth assets, how should retired investors manage their portfolios? ETF Securities recommends three options summarised below: product selection, income diversification and portfolio construction. You can read the full paper by downloading above. 1. Product Selection In retirement, investors need to be conscious of the quality, flexibility and costs of the products they use for their investments. One product type investors may consider are ETFs which hold characteristics such as lower costs compared to active funds, typically high liquidity allowing investors greater flexibility and are easy to use with less administration compared to shares or bonds. 2. Income diversification Investors have traditionally looked to Australian fixed income for their key yield option. In the current environment, they should consider diversifying their income,such as looking at fixed income internationally where there may be higher yields available or through dividend streams. Dividend streams can be a riskier option, and where some retired investors may use high yield shares and offset the risks in other ways, others can look to options in more stable, less cyclical industries like infrastructure. 3. Portfolio construction Retired investors should consider the overall construction of their portfolios and ensure they are diversified across assets and regions for growth and income, after all, the portfolio still needs to grow and support the lifespan. One area retired investors may wish to look at incorporating as part of the overall construction is alternatives, in the form of commodities like gold which can assist with stability and diversification. For more information on the solutions ETF Securities offers, please speak to your financial adviser or contact us on: Sales Trading Phone +61 2 8311 3488 Email: infoAU@etfsecurities.com.au Phone +61 2 8311 3483 Email: primarymarkets@etfsecurities.com.au

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The conflicting challenges of retirement

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Feb 11, 2020

To access the 'No retirement for investments' white paper, please click the download now button above. Important notice: a previous version of this whitepaper incorrectly stated the ASFA comfortable retirement standards for a couple as $43,787/year and superannuation balance of $545,000. These figures relate to the comfortable retirement standards of a single not a couple. The standards for a couple are $61,786/year and $640,000 in superannuation balance. Managing a retirement portfolio for income and growth Retirement portfolios offer a particular challenge in advice, given their more complex needs. They need to generate a stable income, preserve capital and still offer some level of growth to allow investors to manage inflation and longevity risks, along with a reasonable standard of lifestyle. In the paper No retirement for investments, ETF Securities considers how assets, portfolio construction and product selection can be used to manage retirement in the current market environment. You can download the full paper above, or read the summary following. Part of the solution comes down to diversification of the assets used for income. Retired investors have traditionally relied on domestic fixed income to support their yield needs but are now forced to consider other options. Fixed income can still play a role, for example, diversifying to international sources such as US fixed income which currently offers a higher interest rate may be part of the answer. Commonly, investors are being forced into riskier income approaches, such as through dividend streams. High yield equities may work for some retired investors, pending their risk tolerance along with overall portfolio construction. For example, they may consider how to offset the higher risks of high yield shares in other parts of their portfolio. Using alternatives in the form of commodities like gold may assist with offering stability and diversification to manage the volatility which could occur in high yield shares. Alternatively, looking to investments in more stable, less cyclical industries may be more suitable. Infrastructure is one option. It includes many essential services areas like utilities, telecommunications, industrials and transport which tend to be less vulnerable to market movements and cycles. Finally, product choice can be part of the solution to market conditions. Flexibility is important in this environment, but retired investors also need to be conscious of costs, risks and quality. Bearing these in mind, ETFs may be a suitable option due to characteristics such as low costs, ease of use, liquidity and a wide range to assist in meeting specific portfolio needs or gaps. For more information on the solutions ETF Securities offers, please contact us on: Sales Trading Phone +61 2 8311 3488 Email: infoAU@etfsecurities.com.au Phone +61 2 8311 3483 Email: primarymarkets@etfsecurities.com.au

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Weekly ETF Monitor for week ending 7 February 2020

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Feb 11, 2020

This week's highlights Healthcare and technology sectors had a strong week as repercussions on markets as a result of the Coronavirus were more subdued than first thought. The Australian Dollar continued to weaken having a positive effect on unhedged international ETFs. ETFS S&P Biotech ETF (CURE) was the best performing equity ETF over the week returning 6.8%. BetaShares Asia Technology Tigers ETF (ASIA) was up 5.3% and ETFS Battery Tech & Lithium ETF (ACDC) was up 4.5% as Tesla and Orocobre had strong weeks. The worst performers were Chinese equity ETFs, with VanEck Vectors ChinaAMC A-Share ETF (CETF) down 5.4%. Oil and Mining ETFs also had a negative week. VanEck Vectors Gold Miners ETF (GDX) was down 3.6% and BetaShares Crude Oil Index ETF - Ccy Hedged (OOO) was down 2.4%. The best flows were into fixed income products. VanEck Vectors Australian Floating Rate ETF (FLOT) topped the weekly inflows with A$25m. ETFS Physical Gold (GOLD) also had a strong week with A$13m in inflows. The biggest outflows were seen in BetaShares Australia 200 ETF (A200), which had outflows of A$119m. Total inflows over the week were A$296m and total outflows were A$148m.

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Weekly ETF Monitor for week ending 31 January 2020

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Feb 03, 2020

This week's highlights Safe haven assets bounced back last week as global uncertainty surged around the global pandemic of the Coronavirus. ETFS Physical Gold (GOLD) was up 3.3% over the week and ETFS Physical Silver (ETPMAG) was also up 2.3%. Currency ETFs also had a good week as the Australian dollar weakened against global majors. BetaShares British Pound ETF (POU) was up 2.9% and ETFS Enhanced USD Cash ETF (ZUSD) was up 2%. Asian Equity ETFs saw mostly red last week. The iShares MSCI South Korea Capped ETF (IKO) was down 6.5% and iShares Asia 50 ETF (IAA) was also down 5%. Further drops were seen throughout Asia with the BetaShares Japan ETF (Hedged) (HJPN) down 4.1%. One month into the new year sees precious metals and technology ETFs as the best performers. ETFS Physical Palladium (ETPMPD) is the best performer YTD up 25.5%. Net flows for the week were down but still positive. Inflows totalled $228 Million whilst outflows were $76 Million. The biggest outflow was in SPDR S&P/ASX 200 Fund (STW) with $51 Million redeemed. The biggest inflows were into iShares S&P/ASX 200 ETF (IOZ) $25 Million and iShares Global High Yield Bond (AUD Hedged) ETF (IHHY) $23 Million.

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Weekly ETF Monitor for week ending 24 January 2020

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Jan 29, 2020

This week's highlights Defensive equity funds were the flavour of the week with gold miners (GDX and MNRS), infrastructure (VBLD and CORE) and real estate (DJRE) topping the performance tables. Asia and emerging markets funds (IZZ, CETF, CNEW, IAA and VGE) were amongst the poorest performers. Energy company fund (FUEL) also suffered on falling crude prices. Precious metals all gained, with the exception of silver. GOLD returned 1.2% for the week, while palladium (ETPMPD) touched new all-time highs before pulling-back. Crude oil dipped below US$54/bbl and oil ETF OOO declined 7.5% for the week. Total flows into domestically domiciled ETFs were $364m, while outflows totalled $15m. SPDS S&P/ASX 200 Fund (STW) saw the largest inflows for the week, followed closely by a range of domestic equity (MVR and A200) and fixed income (AAA, QPON and CRED) funds. Emerging market equities (IEM) and gold (GOLD) also saw strong flows. IOZ was the most traded fund last week, followed by VAS and STW. VHY and QPON saw above average volumes. ETFS Global Core Infrastructure ETF (CORE) returned 1.6% last week and is up 5.8% year-to-date. CORE provides exposure to 75 listed-infrastructure firms from global developed markets that exhibit low volatility relative to their peers.

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