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Weekly ETF Monitor for week ending 13 March 2020

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Mar 17, 2020

This week's highlights COVID-19 and Saudi Arabia’s aggressive moves to ramp up oil supply saw for one of the most volatile weeks ever across financial markets. Bearish ETFs (BBOZ, BBUS and BEAR) were the top performing funds, while foreign currency funds (YANK, ZUSD, USD, EEU and POU) also saw strong gains for the week. Amongst long-only equity funds, only China ETFs (CETF and IZZ) saw green. On the negative side, there were many. Energy companies were hit hardest – FUEL fell 27% for the week. Gold miners were also hit hard, despite the metal trading flat in AUD terms. European equity funds (HEUR) were also amongst the biggest decliners. Precious metals were not immune. Gold dropped 7% is US dollar terms, but held its ground in AUD. Palladium gave up most of its recent gains, dropping nearly 30%. Oil ETF OOO fell 23% for the week. The Australian dollar fell below US62c for the first time since 2008. Total flows into domestically domiciled ETFs were $460m, while outflows totalled $468m. Domestic equity funds dominated flows with A200 and STW seeing the largest inflows and IOZ seeing the largest outflows. GOLD, QAU and USD saw strong haven flows, while crude oil fund OOO saw speculative inflows following the massive price drop. Bearish domestic fund BBOZ was the most traded fund last week, followed by broad-based funds VAS, STW and IOZ. Other leveraged funds, BBUS and GEAR, saw above average trading. ETFS Enhanced USD Cash ETF (ZUSD) returned 7.8% for the week, benefiting from the strengthening US dollar and the stability of cash amidst the turmoil in more volatile asset classes.

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Weekly ETF Monitor for week ending 6 March 2020

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Mar 10, 2020

This week's highlights Gold miners headlined the top performers in a turbulent week, with MNRS and GDX seeing returns in excess of 8%. Defensive sectors, including healthcare (DRUG), consumer staples (IXI) and infrastructure (IFRA) were also amongst the top performers alongside bearish funds BBOZ and BEAR. Financial sector ETFs (MVB, OZF, QFN and BNKS) were the week’s poorest performers, with high beta plays such as India (NDIA) and technology (TECH) also seeing declines. Gold continued to push higher, trading above US$1,690/oz towards the end of the week. Hedged gold (QAU) added 3.7%, while palladium (ETPMPD) dropped 8.0%. Oil saw big declines, with OOO dropping 7.8%. The Australian dollar regained ground, adding close to 3% for the week and AUDS was amongst the week’s top performing funds. Total flows into domestically domiciled ETFs were $424m, while outflows totalled $181m. iShares S&P/ASX 200 ETF (IOZ) and ETFS Physical Gold (GOLD) saw the largest inflows for the week. BetaShares Australian High Interest Cash ETF (AAA) saw the bulk of the week’s outflows. VAS was the most traded fund last week, followed by IOZ. BBOZ and MGE saw above average volumes.

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Three megatrends and how to invest

Mar 09, 2020

To access the white paper, please click the download now button above. Investors considering growth in the portfolio may find megatrends offer an alternative and sustainable long-term approach. So, what are megatrends and how can you invest in them? Megatrends are universal socioeconomic, environmental or technological forces that change the way we do things . These trends tend to be sustained over longer periods, in some cases, 20 years or more and based on known patterns and pressures . Investing in megatrends has become increasingly accessible in recent times. A range of ETFs have appeared in the market to target specific trends and incorporate a wide range of companies in that area. Three examples of megatrends follow. 1. Virtual connectivity and digitisation The internet is becoming faster and cheaper to access, with close to 60% of the world’s population already users . There are a range of opportunities following from the movement online, such as ecommerce or online entertainment and gaming. Even data storage and security are becoming major concerns. Access to this megatrend can be broadly through sectors like technology that service and fuel this trend, regions with companies dominating this trend, such as the US or across Asia, or via niche subthemes like robotics and artificial intelligence. 2. The growth of the Asian middle-class Two-thirds of the world’s middle-class population are expected to reside across Asia by 2030 and this offers potential for a range of industries, such as luxury goods, tourism, education and healthcare. Many global players have turned their focus to targeting consumers in this region, while regionally based companies like Alibaba or Infosys Ltd are well positioned for future growth. Investors can consider sectors like healthcare which will benefit from the growth or take a more concentrated approach by investing across Asia or within specific countries, like India. 3. Limited resources Ongoing population growth and climate change are placing pressure on available resources including minerals, energy, water and food sources. This has forced an evolution in terms of new products, how we consume and how companies interact with us. Renewable energy and battery storage is one area tipped to grow off the back of this megatrend. Many larger corporations have also started to adjust their operations too, for example, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos pledged $10bn to fight climate change through the Bezos Earth Fund . Investors may consider sub-themes like battery technology or electric cars, or they could consider industries which may experience higher demand on the basis of restricted resources like agriculture. For more information on the solutions ETF Securities offers, please contact us on: Sales Trading Phone +61 2 8311 3488 Email: sales@etfsecurities.com.au Phone +61 2 8311 3483 Email: primarymarkets@etfsecurities.com.au

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Investing in megatrends

Mar 09, 2020

To access the white paper, please click the download now button above. Investors seeking growth in their portfolios need to look outside the box for opportunities in today’s market. The so-called blue-chips of the past are not necessarily the growth drivers of today or the future. Investing in megatrends may offer an effective and sustainable approach to growth in investor portfolios. Megatrends are universal socioeconomic, environmental or technological forces that change the way we do things . These trends tend to be sustained over longer periods, in some cases, 20 years or more and based on known patterns and pressures . Investing in megatrends has become increasingly accessible in recent times due to the abundance of managed investments focused on them. There are a range of megatrends influencing the world. A few of these are covered below. 1. Virtual connectivity and digitisation The internet is becoming faster and cheaper to access, with close to 60% of the world’s population already users . There are a range of opportunities following from the movement online, such as ecommerce or online entertainment and gaming. Even data storage and security are becoming major concerns. Access to this megatrend can be broadly through sectors like technology that service and fuel this trend, regions with companies dominating this trend, such as the US or across Asia, or via niche subthemes like robotics and artificial intelligence. Products in focus: > ETFS Morningstar Global Technology ETF (TECH) > ETFS ROBO Global Robotics and Automation ETF (ROBO) > ETFS FANG+ETF (FANG) 2. The growth of the Asian middle-class Two-thirds of the world’s middle-class population are expected to reside across Asia by 2030 and this offers potential for a range of industries, such as luxury goods, tourism, education and healthcare. Many global players have turned their focus to targeting consumers in this region, while regionally based companies like Alibaba or Infosys Ltd are well positioned for future growth. Investors can consider sectors like healthcare which will benefit from the growth or take a more concentrated approach by investing across Asia or within specific countries, like India. Products in focus: > ETFS Reliance India Nifty 50 ETF (NDIA) > ETFS FANG+ETF (FANG) 3. Limited resources Ongoing population growth and climate change are placing pressure on available resources including minerals, energy, water and food sources. This has forced an evolution in terms of new products, how we consume and how companies interact with us. Renewable energy and battery storage is one area tipped to grow off the back of this megatrend. Many larger corporations have also started to adjust their operations too, for example, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos pledged $10bn to fight climate change through the Bezos Earth Fund . Investors may consider sub-themes like battery technology or electric cars, or they could consider industries which may experience higher demand on the basis of restricted resources like agriculture. Products in focus: > ETFS Battery Tech and Lithium ETF (ACDC) > ETFS FANG+ETF (FANG) For more information on the solutions ETF Securities offers, please contact us on: Sales Trading Phone +61 2 8311 3488 Email: sales@etfsecurities.com.au Phone +61 2 8311 3483 Email: primarymarkets@etfsecurities.com.au

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Weekly ETF Monitor for week ending 28 February 2020

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Mar 03, 2020

This week's highlights Risk-off sentiment dominated last week with equity markets entering correction territory across the globe. Bearish ETFs (BBUS, BBOZ and BEAR) were by far the top performing funds for the week. Geared funds aside, the biggest declines were seen across a range of sectors, including gold miners (MNRS), energy (FUEL), real estate (REIT) and banks (BNKS). Precious metals were mixed. Gold reached its highest level in seven years, before retreating later in the week. Palladium (ETPMPD) once again reached new all-time highs. Oil saw big declines, with OOO dropping 16.2% for the week. The Australian dollar fell below US65c for the first time since the GFC, driving currency ETFs higher. BetaShares Euro ETF (EEU) and ETFS Enhanced USD Cash ETF (ZUSD) were amongst the week’s top performers. Total flows into domestically domiciled ETFs were $381m, while outflows totalled $86m. BetaShares Australian High Interest Cash ETF (AAA) and ETFS Physical Gold (GOLD) saw the largest inflows for the week as investors looked for safe-haven assets. iShares Global 100 ETF (IOO) and BetaShares S&P/ASX 200 Resources Sector ETF (QRE) saw the bulk of the week’s outflows. VAS was the most traded fund last week, followed by AAA. GOLD and BBOZ saw above average volumes. ETFS FANG+ ETF (FANG) commenced trading this week. FANG offers exposure to an equally-weighted portfolio of ten of the world’s top innovators across today’s tech and internet/media companies.

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The economic return of the Indian elephant

Mar 03, 2020

What drove India’s performance in 2019 and its outlook for 2020 Investors are increasingly seeing India as a high potential growth market, but it under-performed expectations in 2019. The country continues to see positive structural and economic reforms, leading to the question, what happened and does this change India’s prospects? Read the full paper here. Three drivers of negative performance in 2019 Global markets were generally affected by a range of events across 2019, including the US/China trade war, slowing growth and fear of recession. Beyond this, there were three key drivers behind India’s negative performance. 1. Non-banking financial companies (NBFC) crisis In the last quarter of 2018, an NBFC company called Infrastructure Leasing & Finance Services (IL &FS) defaulted on multiple loans and covenants across India. As a result, banks and mutual funds stopped lending to NBFCs which triggered a liquidity and confidence issue across India which dragged on performance, particularly in early 2019. 2. Government election Though Narendra Modi returned to power in the government election, the focus was on re-election rather than continued structural economic growth in the lead-up to polls. 3. Kashmir Hostilities between India and Pakistan escalated, with the volatility also felt in the economy. These drivers in turn affected manufacturing, core-sector production and consumer and capital goods production. India’s automobile and real estate sectors were also hard-hit. India’s future prospects The Indian government and Reserve Bank of India (RBI) implemented two key measures to resolve the problems of 2019. These included: > Five rate cuts by the RBI to 5.15%. > A corporate tax cut from 30% to 22%. India’s outlook for 2020 is further supported by factors such as low inflation, ongoing reforms and political stability. As such, the prospects remain positive and it is anticipated to continue to benefit from overarching themes across Asia such as the growth of the middle-class. You can access India through the ETFS Reliance India Nifty 50 ETF (ASX Code: NDIA). For more information on the solutions ETF Securities offers, please contact us on: Sales Trading Phone +61 2 8311 3488 Email: sales@etfsecurities.com.au Phone +61 2 8311 3483 Email: primarymarkets@etfsecurities.com.au

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